Police use high-tech equipment to scour the yard of William Tyrrell’s adoptive grandmother

A forensic expert has revealed the high-tech tools used by detectives as they search for the body of William Tyrrell at the property he disappeared from seven years ago.

Police arrived at the home of the missing child’s adoptive grandmother on the NSW North Coast on Tuesday, where they were pictured sieving through the dirt around the house and gardens with large sieves.

They were also seen using levelers, drones and other machinery on Wednesday as they continued to search Kendall’s property where the boy was last pictured.

The practices are widely used by experts when searching for human remains, including small bones and teeth, according to Professor David Ranson of the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine.

“They have publicly stated that they believe he is dead and so to understand how he died the body is a very important piece of potential evidence in finding out what happened,” Professor Ranson told Daily MailAustralia.

“Efforts are directed towards locating and identifying the body.”

A forensic expert has revealed that detectives are likely searching the ground for remains on the property where William Tyrrell disappeared seven years ago.

Volunteers from the Rural Fire Service search the <a class=home of William’s adoptive grandmother in Kendall on Tuesday” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

Volunteers from the Rural Fire Service search the home of William’s adoptive grandmother in Kendall on Tuesday

The practices are widely used by experts when searching for human remains, including small bones and teeth

The practices are widely used by experts when searching for human remains, including small bones and teeth

William disappeared wearing his Spider-Man suit while playing at his adoptive grandmother's house in 2014 in Kendall, about 40 kilometers south of Port Macquarie

William disappeared wearing his Spider-Man suit while playing at his adoptive grandmother’s house in 2014 in Kendall, about 40 kilometers south of Port Macquarie

The forensic expert said small human remains can often be dispersed via ground or moving animals and revealed the variety of technologies and tools used by detectives to find a body.

‘They will use remote procedures including images of the sky, light aircraft or drones, vegetation changes and landscape changes which could suggest a clandestine grave,’ Prof Ranson told Daily Mail Australia.

“Then you need ground searches, trying to locate forms of investigative information.

“There are also techniques used to identify biological material or blood, but after seven years it’s really hard to find those things.”

The type of soil on the property and the condition it is in is also crucial for detectives, as different variants of dirt will have different effects on the human remains.

Professor Randon said how a body is buried has a huge impact on its preservation.

“It’s important because depending on how a body was placed in the ground, it can be on the surface and can be deep, resulting in different degrees of preservation,” he said.

“A deep burial can see a well-preserved body, whereas shallow burials covered in leaves and branches can potentially be very disturbed by insects and animals.

Police arrived with cadaver dogs on Tuesday as their massive search of the property and surrounding area began

Police arrived with cadaver dogs on Tuesday as their massive search of the property and surrounding area began

Experts have used UV rays to try to locate sources of blood, which Professor Ranson said would be difficult after seven years

Experts have used UV rays to try to locate sources of blood, which Professor Ranson said would be difficult after seven years

The forensic expert said small human remains can often be dispersed via soil or moving animals, with the possibility of having to follow animal tracks into burrows if they think large pieces could have be transported.

The forensic expert said small human remains can often be dispersed via soil or moving animals, with the possibility of having to follow animal tracks into burrows if they think large pieces could have be transported.

William Tyrrell (pictured) disappeared from his adoptive grandmother's home seven years ago

William Tyrrell (pictured) disappeared from his adoptive grandmother’s home seven years ago

Authorities have access to the best technology in the country in their research, including heat-sensing devices, analysis of vegetation regrowth, ground contour changes and other aerial photography.

Prof Ranson said the responsibility of forensic experts is to ‘piece together’ the events before a potential death rather than the cause.

“The task of the forensic person is to piece together the circumstances surrounding the death, it’s not so much about the cause of death,” he explained.

“They will look at injury patterns, what they mean in terms of causality of injury, and then apply forensic work in relation to fractures.

“If you find a skeleton or areas of hemorrhage in the body, what trauma can lead to that.”

Drones have been used to monitor vegetation changes in the area, which may provide clues as to where a body might be located

Drones have been used to monitor vegetation changes in the area, which may provide clues as to where a body might be located

Authorities have access to the best technology in the country in their research, including heat-sensing devices, analysis of vegetation regrowth, ground contour changes and other aerial photography.

Authorities have access to the best technology in the country in their research, including heat-sensing devices, analysis of vegetation regrowth, ground contour changes and other aerial photography.

Professor Ranson said the responsibility of forensic experts is to

Prof Ranson said the responsibility of forensic experts is to ‘reconstruct’ the events before a potential death rather than the cause

Police seized a Mazda (pictured) which once belonged to the adoptive grandmother of William Tyrrell, who died earlier this year

Police seized a Mazda (pictured) which once belonged to the adoptive grandmother of William Tyrrell, who died earlier this year

William disappeared wearing his Spider-Man suit while playing at his adoptive grandmother’s house in 2014 in Kendall, about 40 kilometers south of Port Macquarie.

Police seized a car that once belonged to the adoptive grandmother of missing William Tyrrell on Wednesday as the search for the boy’s remains enters its third day.

Tyrrell’s adoptive grandmother died aged 88 in March and it is understood her car was seized from someone unconnected to the investigation.

Police are now investigating new theories about William’s mysterious disappearance as detectives continue to search the property where he disappeared.

They include the theory that William fell from a balcony at his adoptive grandmother’s house, who died in March this year aged 88.

The timeline of events after William Tyrrell disappeared from the Kendall household over seven years ago

The timeline of events after William Tyrrell disappeared from the Kendall household over seven years ago

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